Posted on

where to find weed seeds in the wild

This type of area is commonly identified by having a natural hot, wet and cold summer, dry winters, and more described with the definite large parts of water such as seas and oceans. The Marijuana strains that grow within these wild part areas have already adapted to become tolerable in distinctive weather conditions for the whole year. Examples of strains that grow with these continental types of areas are the Nepalese Landrace and the Swiss Sativa.

The marijuana strains that can be able to grow in dry areas must also deal with the extreme temperature changes from day and night temperature differences. Dry areas refer to the deserts and broad areas that also give rise to strong and famous cannabis strains Afghani or the Afghanistan landrace and the Sinai that are known to flourish in dry and sometimes windy climate conditions.

The temperate areas are where you find cannabis weed that requires more temperate weather in order for them to flourish in the wild area. Cannabis strains such as Lebanese Red and the Swazi Gold that grow in temperate areas that have warm but considered to be not too hot like the Mediterranean climate.

Continental Areas

The type of marijuana that grows in the wild is called the “ditch weed” or wild marijuana that commonly grows inside of the roads. It is usually a small and bushy kind of plant that does not definitely contain a high amount of THC levels. But this is not to say that those who have high THC content weed are not growing in the wild; it is likely a situation that before it reaches its maturity, it may be eaten by a deer in the wild.

There are also known about the huge field in which the weed is germinating right, left and center in parts of Mexico and Jamaica. In Jamaica, marijuana is considered a huge part of their culture. It is even available every time, and the laws in Jamaica also begin to get along with it. In these two parts of the world, their humidity, as well as the heat, is something that has to be commonly thrown into the field, and you can assure that it will germinate into a marijuana plant.

In this post, you’ll learn where cannabis tends to grow naturally, which serves as your reference when growing varying cannabis strains.

The humidity, heat, and even the rainfall consistency in tropical climates such as in rainforest and savannas are very suitable for most kinds of marijuana plants to possibly grow in the wild. The extreme sunlight exposure and moderate winter may offer the strain having an ideal condition during the long growing period.

what I am wondering is without support from humans properly loving them, how do they survive in northern climates year round where it freezes the ground, or any climate for that matter since they will all have limited light at certain parts of the year.

I may be out of my element on the understanding of how plants work in the natural (wild) sense, but i’ve had this thought on my mind for awhile since there are some outdoor strands that are wild, "Saturna Sativa" for instance.

do they drop the seeds after death and hope those will stay frozen over the winter?

Below is a picture gallery with shots of the wild Cannabis Ruderalis plants growing on a sunny roadside. Notice the very sativa-like thin leaves. These plants were likely hit at least once by mowers, but still managed to put out seeds by early September (some plants I found were already long gone to seed). There are also shots of the typical small, black, and very hard ruderalis seeds, as well as closeups showing the trichomes on the leaves and buds, immature as they unfortunately were. Cool stuff, regardless, and I look forward to growing the gathered seeds in a nurturing environment. Expect more posts about these plants:

The particularly cool part of the story is that the one larger, seedless bud had an amazing orange/pepper/cream aroma that I’d rank up there with some of the better sativa plants I’ve had the pleasure to sniff. Sadly, the whir of weed-whackers was not far behind me; a road crew was out for a late summer cleanup. I would have loved to let the beautiful sinsemilla bud mature, but I decided to pick her now in order to get some better pictures and a chance to sample the immature bud. I hurried ahead of the cutting crew and gathered seeds from the other female plants I could find. Hopefully a few of the couple dozen seeds I gathered will produce a plant with that amazing orange/pepper/cream aroma phenotype. In any case, they will serve as a great breeding platform for some autoflowering hybrids of my own. It will be great to have a ruderalis plant that already produces great aromas as stock to cross with other varieties (like my current favorite “Double Gum”) and see if I can cross-breed some heavier yielding autoflowering stock of my own. Perhaps these will become the “Panik Plants”?

On an early autumn walk, I found several cannabis ruderalis plants growing wild. To my surprise and delight, I found several seed-bearing plants and even one sinsemilla bud, which must have been upwind of the male plants I saw, already dried and dead, near the seed-carrying females up the road.

Last fall, we collected seeds from wild C. Ruderalis marijuana plants growing along roadsides and in fallow land (see the post here). We planted them early last month, Read More…

Wild Harvest Cannabis Ruderalis Smoke Report: Well, it isn’t fair to judge these plants based on the few wisps of bud I gathered in a hurry, but the good news is that they do produce a mild sativa-like effect. As is to be expected with a ruderalis (especially one with a few seeds on it) the smoke is a bit on the ropey side, but they do create a mild but pleasant head high. This is a very good start for a wild strain. If I can find that orange creamsicle pheno in the seeds I gathered, we may be onto something here.

[Writer Glenn Panik’s “How To Grow Cannabis At Home: A Guide To Indoor Medical Marijuana Growing”, is available on iBooks here, for the Amazon Kindle or via Smashwords here. You can also order the ‘stealth title’ of our information-packed ebook for the Kindle here.]

Writer Glenn Panik’s “How To Grow Cannabis At Home: A Guide To Indoor Medical Marijuana Growing”, is available on iTunes here, for the Amazon Kindle or via Smashwords here. You can also order the ‘stealth title’ of our information-packed ebook for the Kindle here.