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weed grass with white seeds

Is Pigweed Edible?

Ah, we love much about dandelions with their bright yellow heads in the springtime. They provide an important source of food for bees early in the year, too.

The best control strategy for weeds is always prevention. Before resorting to herbicides, look first to nonchemical weed control methods. Why? Herbicides may be a quick fix this year but will not keep your weed problem from recurring year after year. Only taking preventitive controls will reduce the weed problem in the future.

9. Pigweed (Amaranthus spp.)

How to Control Canada Thistle

Buckhorn Plantain. Photo by Oregon State University.

How to Control Quackgrass

The answer goes back to the definition of weeds: Purslane can produce over 2,000,000 seeds PER PLANT ! Purslane also can reproduce vegetatively through its leaves, making it especially tough to eradicate. Many a gardener hoed purslane one day only to see it growing at full strength the next.

White clover: White clover is a perennial weed that forms creeping runners and produces white, fluffy-looking blooms. Since this weed is a legume which fixes nitrogen, it is often found in lawns with low fertility. Adding nitrogen to the soil can help ease the population of clover.

Broadleaf plantain: Broadleaf plantain is a low-growing perennial. It has broad leaves with prominent veins and may smother lawn grass if left untreated, which generally calls for maintaining thick lawn coverage.

Weeds are a common occurrence in most lawns and gardens. While many of them are quite familiar, there may be some that are not. Learning about some of the most common types of weeds can make it easier to eliminate them from the landscape.

How to Identify Weed Types

Perennial weeds, on the other hand, have more extensive root systems, including taproots, making them more difficult to control. In addition, these weeds come back each year, especially if the roots are not destroyed. Some of the most common (and problematic) perennial weed types include:

Dandelions: Dandelions are well known in many lawns and gardens– their fuzzy yellow blooms popping up nearly anywhere. While their deep taproots make them difficult to control, they generally spread through their easily recognized white, fluffy seedheads.

Common annual weeds include:

Crabgrass: Crabgrass is a homeowner’s worst nightmare, creeping up throughout the lawn. This summer annual lies flat to the ground and has reddish purple stems (both smooth and hairy). It forms slender spike-shaped seedheads just below mowing height, making it difficult to manage.

Crabgrass gets its name from their leaves because they form a tight, crab-like circle. The summer annual germinated when soil temperatures reach a consistent 55 degrees Fahrenheit and appear in weak or bare areas of the lawn. Treating crabgrass can be tricky because over and under watering both favor its growth, along with close mowing. To control it, spray with a pre-emergent crabgrass herbicide in the spring when temperatures reach 55 degrees Fahrenheit to keep seeds from sprouting.

We’ve gathered a list of common weeds you might find in your lawn and what measures you can take to keep them at bay.

Dandelion:

These perennial weeds are pansy-like flowers featuring five blue-violet, lilac or white petals that grows in bunches reaching 2-5 inches tall. Wild violets can quickly take over cool, shady, moist, and fertile soil. Eradicating these weeds can be difficult due to its aggressive growth and resistance to many herbicides. To control, apply a post-emergent broadleaf herbicide as soon as the violets reach the two-leaf stage of growth.

Interestingly, white clover used to be a common ingredient in lawn seed blends. However, now it’s regarded as a common weed in your lawn. White clovers are a low-growing, creeping winter perennial with stems that root at nodes. The elliptical leaves are grouped in threes and usually have a light green or white band like a watermark, plus toothing on the edges. These weeds are most noticed for their white to pink-tinged flower clusters growing from the long stems that usually rise above the leaves. They actively grow in cooler temperatures with increased moisture and where soil is poor and low in nitrogen.

The broadleaf plantain is a perennial weed that has smaller leaves with a green leaf base. Blooming in spring to early summer, you will notice it adapts well to most sites, including drought tolerant conditions and thriving in overwatered soil. They can grow in heavy soils, sunny or shady areas and under very low mowing heights. Since these weeds reproduce readily by seed, they will require repeat applications of a post-emergent, broadleaf herbicide to effectively kill off large populations. To help manage broadleaf plantain aerate your soil, avoid overwatering, and using proper mow cut heights.