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weed buying guide

There are twenty-eight grams in an ounce. That’s 28-56 blunts, or close to one hundred joints.

Ah, the eighth. This is where you really start to get some serious bang for your buck. It’s a little bit cheaper compared to the per gram price of a dub, but an eighth allows you to get a lot more for a better price. Let’s take a look at the eighth weighs and prices below.

And now we’ve made it to the full ounce! In many parts of the country, this is more or less the end of the road for legal bud. In California, and many legal states, the legal maximum amount of marijuana an individual is able to own at a given time is one ounce.

How many grams in an ounce or zip?

But you will find that many of the best legal dispensaries offer 4 gram eighths to incensive buying in bulk compared to buying per gram.

So how much is a dime bag? Traditionally, it has always been a gram of bud for $10 because across the country $10 a gram is the going rate if you only buy one gram at a time. Thus the name dime bag.

Again, for context, that means we are looking at roughly ten blunts or twelve to fifteen joints. And of course, if you like to smoke out of glassware or bongs, the amount of use you get will really be subjective to how you pack your bowls.

The gram is your base unit of measurement when it comes to buying marijuana. A single gram is enough for a few joints (depending on how you roll) or one or two moderate blunts.

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If you haven’t bought marijuana since college, things have changed. Today it’s all about picking a variety that gives you the sensation you want with the flavors and aromas most enjoy. “You don’t have to trust some dude to tell you it’s strong,” says David Drake, founder of CannabisReports.com. One of the best things about legalization is that it’s brought transparency to weed transactions. “Most sellers are treating both the plant and the customer very respectfully,” says Drake, meaning that like a good bartender, most “bud tenders” are happy to walk newbies through their choices. And you have a lot of choices. Currently, Cannabis Reports is tracking 8,000 different varieties of marijuana, including strains from as far away as Afghanistan and Thailand. He compares each of these strains to wine varietals: While Oregon pinots boast a certain terroir, so too does sativa from Mexico. Follow these basic guidelines for a high that feels good and a product that pleases your senses.

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2. Look: The appearance of low-quality flower is distinct. It can come in the form of discolored flower or an abundance of stems and seeds. There are many reasons flower can become discolored ranging from mold and age to pesticides and chemicals. The bottom line is that you don’t want to buy it, let alone smoke it. One very important indicator of bad weed is the appearance of amber-colored trichomes. With time, light, and heat, trichomes turn from clear to an amber hue. This is a dead giveaway that you’ve been swindled into last year’s harvest.

4. Flower structure: Skillfully cultivated and cured sativa-leaning flowers tend to be light and fluffy in shape and composition, while indicas tend to be tighter and denser in flower structure. Though the structure and the experience you end up having usually have little to do with each other. Rock-hard flowers are a sign that cultivators may have used plant growth regulators, which can lead to an unpleasant taste. Extremely fluffy flowers could be a signal that the plant was not grown under sufficient light intensity and was not cultivated to its potential.

Identifying high-quality flower can throw even the most experienced cannabis connoisseurs for a loop, but the key traits that separate good weed from bad weed are smell, appearance, feel, and flower structure. In this article, we’ll break down all four and offer tips for spotting the good stuff and avoiding the bad.

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And is cheap weed always bad? Rae suggested that a low price point could indicate an older product past its shelf life but said that sometimes, “You can often get a nice-smelling, fresh flower for a good value. Beware if a pricey flower has a high THC level, but often a high price reflects the extra care and attention required to make a truly craft product.”

Another important visual indicator of good weed is the amount and viability of trichomes. Trichomes are the tiny, glimmering crystal-like appendages on the plant’s surface that create and hold the compounds responsible for the flower’s smell, flavor, and effects. The more frosty trichomes you can see with the naked eye, the better indicator of the flower’s intoxicating and therapeutic potency. If your eyesight has seen better days or you want to get up close, use a magnifying glass to get an even better sense of a nug’s trichomes.

1. Smell: Low-quality flower can take on a variety of quirky fragrances, which typically means a batch of bad weed. Often referred to as “schwag” or “bottom shelf,” these low-end buds can reek of a musty or mildewy aroma. A musty or straw-like aroma is a clear indication of aged or compromised cannabis. Typically, when stored away from light and heat, cannabis has around a one-year shelf life before starting to really degrade. Unpleasant aromas are generally a sign of mishandling, poorly cured cannabis, or advanced age.

While all good cannabis should be visually appealing, a top-shelf strain can easily display a vibrant array of colors. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps