Posted on

weed and feed or seed first

Fertilizers containing pre-emergent herbicides selectively prevent certain kinds of weeds from finishing their germination cycle. There is no point applying this type of weed-and-feed mix after weeds are growing on your lawn. You have to apply it early in the growing season before weeds appear. Make sure the pre-emergent herbicide in the fertilizer kills the kind of weeds that have plagued your lawn in the past. You might apply a starter fertilizer containing a pre-emergent herbicide before you sow your lawn seeds.

Post emergent herbicides kill weeds after they appear. Some post-emergent, systemic herbicides that you can apply directly on lawns only kill weedy grasses, while others only kill weeds with broadleaf weeds. Contact herbicide such as those including the active ingredient glyphosate kills on contact. To use one of those on a lawn without killing the grass you have to daub it on individual weeds.

You apply pre-emergent herbicides before weed seeds germinate, typically in the spring. Pre-emergent herbicides do not prevent weed seeds from germinating; they suppress the development of weed roots as they germinate. They’re usually effective for two weeks to three months, depending on the formulation, and you have to water the lawn after applying for the herbicide for it to be effective. There are pre-emergent herbicides to kill both broadleaf weeds and weedy grasses. You can apply them before you sow your grass seed. If you apply a pre-emergent herbicide that kills weedy grasses, you have to delay sowing your lawn seed.

Pre-Emergent Weed-and-Feed Fertilizer

You can sow grass seeds now and kill weeds later with a post-emergent herbicide or kill weeds now with a pre-emergent herbicide and plant the seeds later. Weed-and-feed fertilizers are specially formulated combinations of turf fertilizer and herbicides that you apply either before you plant grass seeds or on established lawns.

Post-emergent weed-and-feed formulations kill selective weeds that are already growing in your lawn. Make sure that the herbicide in the formulation you buy kills the type of weeds that are growing in your lawn. Most weeds make their appearance in the spring, the best time to apply weed-and-feed fertilizer.

When soil test results show your lawn’s soil pH is below levels needed for optimal grass health, liming in accordance with recommendations restores proper pH balance, increases nutrient availability and helps keep lawns green. While many lime products are slow to work, products such as Pennington Fast Acting Lime speed up the process and start working immediately.

Even with similar seed types, all grass seed isn’t equal. Learn what’s actually inside the seed bags you or your lawn professional buy. By understanding the seed tags on grass seed products, you can be sure you invest in quality seed. Cheaper price tags can mean less seed versus fillers, old seeds past their prime, more weed seeds and lower germination rates. Getting seed right from the start benefits your lawn and budget.

3. Using lime incorrectly or unnecessarily

Don’t overdo or cut corners. Too much grass seed causes undue competition for resources such as light, water and nutrients, and grass seedlings struggle as a result. Too little seed leaves lawns thin or bare. Always follow “best practice” guidelines for planting grass seed, including site preparation and good seed-to-soil contact, and stick with recommended seeding rates for lush results.

For most of the country, fall is the best time to plant grass seed. This is when cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescues peak in growth, and conditions enhance fast germination and establishment. When paired with innovations such as water-conserving Pennington Smart Seed, proper timing leads to other advantages, including less input of resources, less maintenance and better results.

Knowing your total property size is just the start. All non-lawn areas must then be deducted. This includes the footprints of your house, garage and outbuildings, as well as walkways and the driveway. Only then can you calculate your actual lawn area and the amount of seed you need. Time spent on proper measurements prevents wasted product, wasted money and poor results. Get it right and every bit of seed and labor work in your favor.

Fertilizers are essential to your yard’s health, and it needs to be fed even in the fall and winter seasons. Many professionals suggest that you fertilize at least four times a year with two-month intervals. In some cases, fertilization can be skipped in the summer if your area experiences a substantial rain. That extra water can wash away the fertilizer, and those chemicals can end up in your drinking supply.

If you want to improve your lawn’s appearance, then you will need a weed control product and fertilizer. However, you need to apply these products in a specific order. The first course of action should be to use a safe herbicide to get rid of those weeds. Not only are weeds unsightly, but they can steal nutrients and water from your grass. The roots of the weeds will also compete for space in the first few inches of your soil, and they can effectively “choke” the grass and plant roots. As you can tell, it is vital to get rid of those weeds in your first step.

Check Your Soil Health

Weeds can affect the health of your grass and plants. You will want to get rid of them before adding fertilizers to your yard. While fertilizers are created to boost the nutrients of your grass, these products can be harsh. When weeds are already stressing out the lawn, you don’t want to add a product that can cause additional problems for the health of your grass.

For your specific product, you will want to follow the instructions of the weed killer and fertilizers. When applying the weed killer, you should lightly water the lawn for a better application. Fertilizers required you to apply them on sunny days with no chance of rain. You want the chemicals to soak into the ground and not wash away.

In any garden center, you will find a wide variety of “weed and feed” products. However, many of these products are not designed to kill those established weeds. These products use a preemergent herbicide formula to stop weed germination. If you have an established weed problem in your yard, you will want to avoid these weed and feed formulas. You should focus on the spot control strategy to target those weeds. When you use herbicides and fertilizers separately, you can apply them in a specific manner for better control of your lawn care.