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seeds in weed bad

We hear this question all the time from clients and beginner growers, and the answer is a resounding no. There is simply no way to tell the sex of a cannabis seed just by looking at it.

It’s important to only conduct this test if you are planning to germinate the seeds immediately afterwards. The viable seeds that sunk to the bottom of the glass will have taken in water, crossing the membrane of the seed and signalling that it’s time to come to life—activating germination.

Growing Seeds From A Bag (Bagseed)

Are your seeds light or dark in colour? Are they tough or do they turn to dust when you press them between your fingers? These are just some of the ways to tell if a seed is healthy and worth growing. Keep reading to learn more.

Immature cannabis seeds, on the other hand, tend to be green and have a soft outer shell that breaks when any kind of pressure is applied to it.

Remember, just like animals and other living things, cannabis seeds are biologically different from one another (even if they are technically the same strain) and therefore will exhibit different physical characteristics. Don’t let these natural differences fool you into thinking that a larger, rounder, and darker seed (for example) is of better quality than a lighter, smaller, and more oval-shaped one.

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

There’s a seed in my bud!

Does it mean the weed is bad?

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

It should be dark and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds, that can be easily crushed between the fingers, usually won’t sprout. However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding them for hard seeds after all) so when in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts!

This doesn’t mean it is bad for your health but we advise against smoking seeds. Please remove them as you see them – you may find them crushed up in your grinder! The presence of seeds does mean that the total mass of smokable weed is compromised with decreased cannabinoid content and quite a few unwanted seeds. Think about it this way: If you purchase an ounce of cannabis and it comes filled with seeds, you are paying for the seeds which are less desirable than the cannabis flower that you were expecting.

Growing from home allows you to control many factors, so you can expect higher quality cannabis. If you are able to grow indoors, theres an even lower chance of your cannabis plants getting fertilized, as you would have to have the males in the tent/ grow box with them! When using a Grobo, you never have to worry about male plants being too close to your females.

Why This Matters

The term sinsemilla is derived from the Spanish words “sin” (meaning “without”) and “semilla” (meaning “seed”) to mean as stated, without seed. This word has been associated with seedless cannabis flower since the 1970’s in North America but there is some evidence of it dating back further to countries like India! To clear up a few myths; sinsemilla is NOT a strain or genetics. It is a female cannabis plant that has not been exposed to male plants (aka not fertilized).

The buds should be fat, dense, and hard to squeeze. When you’re able to look at the buds up close, you want to see if any seeds, stems, or leaves are easily identified. Beyond that you want to examine the color. The verdant nature of the bud is indicative of how healthy it is. Basically the richer the green color, the healthier the plant. This green is also a representation of how well treated the plant was before it reached you. If the curing and the drying process was conducted appropriately it will maintain its rich, green color. Cannabis of lower quality tends to be a dull green, or even brown.

If you’re feeling ambitious you can take the seeds out of your pot and try to grow from them. Here are a couple tips for determining whether or not to grow with the seeds you find: