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potting weed seeds

If you’re ready for a more serious approach, make sure you have the space for a proper garden and pop the seeds to see what fruit they bear.

A lot of classic weed strains that have been around for a while come in feminized form. Some popular fem seeds are:

Seeds found in finished cannabis buds can develop for a number of reasons. For example, a male plant may have accidentally pollinated a flowering female during the growing process. But more commonly, they’re a sign of stress and can be attributed to high temperatures during the final stages of flowering or an exaggerated spike in climate or environment.

Time to germinate

As we’ve mentioned, cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning male and female reproductive organs appear on different plants.

If cannabis is legal in your state, you can buy seeds or clones from a local dispensary, or online through various seed banks.

It’s important to keep the delicate seed sterile, so don’t touch the seed or taproot as it begins to split.

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

If you don’t transplant, then you eliminate the risk of transplant shock. But you also limit the potential of your cannabis plants. That being said, a first and final transplant is sometimes the best option for autoflowering strains with a short life cycle.

Stretchy or floppy seedling growth can be due to genetics. Often, it’s an indication the grow lamp is positioned too far away from the canopy. A cool white 250W CFL can comfortably hang 15cm above a dozen or more seedlings without scorching leaves.

Next, make an impression in your large container with another small pot, or the one with the plant in it if you don’t have any others. Make this impression in the medium after you have watered it. This creates a perfect imprint for the transplant.

HOW TO TRANSPLANT SEEDLINGS

The right time to transplant your seedlings is just before they outgrow their current container. With cubes, you can see roots poking out telling you it’s time to pot up. When you start with a cup or small pot, you are relying on above-ground cues. Typically, when the set or sets of true leaves of the seedling have spread out to cover the circumference of the container, it’s time. Also, vertical growth will be an obvious indicator.

The seedling phase is arguably the most important of the entire cannabis life cycle. Whether you grow from seed or clone, the hands-on part of cultivation begins with seedlings. Transplanting is all important. Get it wrong, and the crop could be lost. Get it right, and grow great ganja with this guide.

An oxygen-rich medium that drains well is the ideal mix for soil and/or coco growers. Between these two growing styles, there is the most overlap during the seedling stage. Peat or coco cubes are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. Similar to a rockwool block, you can visually monitor root development as the white spaghetti strands protrude from the cube. Growers, both organic and hydro, working with clones report the highest success rates using the cube-sized starter mediums.

If your final container size is up to 11l, you have the option to sow seeds directly. This is only a viable option when growing from seed. Clones will not take root in such a large container. Initially, seedlings in large pots will grow more slowly than those in smaller containers. After a few weeks of vegetative growth, the difference is negligible.

Whenever you start feeding your plants, we recommend giving them half the recommended dose of fertiliser during the first week of feeding. This gives the plants time to adjust to their new diet.

Cannabis seeds need four things in order to germinate: moisture, warmth, darkness, and time. To ensure you grow healthy seedlings, germinate your seeds using one of the following techniques.

• Drainage holes

HOW TO AVOID NUTRIENT PROBLEMS

When it comes to picking pots, we recommend the following approaches for autoflowering and feminized seedlings.

Contents:

Similarly, under-potting can be just as detrimental to your plants. Plants that are root-bound take up water very quickly, encouraging you to water them more regularly than necessary, leading to overwatering.

Remember to water just around the stem of your seedlings, and only once the soil has completely dried out (see the section on over/underwatering below for more info). Also, keep in mind that seedlings (especially autoflowering varieties) are extremely sensitive to nutrients. Never plant them into hot (nutrient-rich) soil and don’t start feeding them until they’ve grown 3–4 sets of true leaves.