Posted on

jimson weed seeds for sale

Native Range
Central and South America

1 pkg (approx 30-50 seeds)

Culinary Uses
Not for internal use.

Common Names
Jimson Weed, Jamestown Weed, Thorn Apple, Devil’s Apple, Angel Trumpets, Moon Flower, Toloache

Botanical Name
Datura stramonium

This herb has many medicinal properties appreciated for a very long time.
It treats asthma, coughing spasms, muscle spasms and relieves Parkinson’s disease symptoms.
Datura stramonium, like deadly nightshade , can be applied directly to the skin to relieve rheumatic pain and neuralgia.

Jimson weed or Datura stramonium is a very robust annual plant.
It is an annual plant of the solanaceae family just like the henbane or the mandrake .
This plant produces large trumpet-shaped flowers of white color and many fruits in the shape of horse chestnut.
Jimson weed seeds are black, the size of those of the black Ipomoea or firecracker vine .

Sowing seeds of Jimson weed:
The germination of this seeds is sometimes capricious, to remedy this, it is better to stratify the seeds.
Sow the seeds of Datura stramonium by 5 or 6 in small pots of 10 cm.
Cover jimson weed seeds under a few centimeters of fine soil and then stratify naturally or artificially your pots with seeds for 2 to 3 weeks.
Once germinated, wait until the datura plants are 10 cm before transplanting them to the garden.

This esoteric plant is also used for esoteric rituals around the world.
In America for healings, rituals, travels in the underworld.
In India as an aphrodisiac.

Also exists as a live plant for growing.
Shamanic and ethnobotanical plant seeds to collect.
Do not consume. Toxic plant to collect only.

Datura has been used in traditional medicine to relieve asthma symptoms and as an analgesic during surgery or bonesetting. It is also a powerful hallucinogen and deliriant, which is used spiritually for the intense visions it produces. However, the tropane alkaloids responsible for both the medicinal and hallucinogenic properties are fatally toxic in only slightly higher amounts than the medicinal dosage, and careless use often results in hospitalizations and deaths.

The amount of toxins varies widely from plant to plant. As much as a 5:1 variation can be found between plants, and a given plant’s toxicity depends on its age, where it is growing, and the local weather conditions.[14] Additionally, within a given datura plant, toxin concentration varies by part and even from leaf to leaf. When the plant is younger, the ratio of scopolamine to atropine is about 3:1; after flowering, this ratio is reversed, with the amount of scopolamine continuing to decrease as the plant gets older.[19] In traditional cultures, a great deal of experience with and detailed knowledge of Datura was critical to minimize harm.[14] An individual datura seed contains about 0.1 mg of atropine, and the approximate fatal dose for adult humans is >10 mg atropine or >2–4 mg scopolamine.

Jimson weed Seeds or Devil’s snare (Datura stramonium)

The Zuni once used datura as an analgesic, to render patients unconscious while broken bones were set.[27] The Chinese also used it in this manner, as a form of anaesthesia during surgery.

The common name “datura” has its roots in ancient India, where the plant is considered particularly sacred—believed to be a favorite of the Hindu god Shiva Nataraja.

Datura stramonium, known by the common names Jimson weed or Devil’s snare, is a plant in the nightshade family. It is believed to have originated in Mexico, but has now become naturalized in many