Posted on

how long to germinate weed seeds in paper towel

The best germination method depends on the cultivator’s choice. Here are some of the most common ways to pop your cannabis seeds.

So, you’ve decided to grow your own cannabis plants. You purchased a pack of seeds, assembled cultivation materials, cleared a space in your garden, and are ready to grow your first cannabis crop . With everything in hand, it’s time to begin the very first step of cannabis cultivation : germinating seeds.

Preparing to germinate cannabis seeds

Gently water the soil with a spray bottle and situate your pots under a fluorescent lamp. Keep seeds away from the windowsill, as the temperature is too volatile for germination. In general, you’ll want to keep the temperature in the range of 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

It’s essential to acquire high-quality cannabis seeds for germination, as these will go on to become high-quality cannabis plants. Seeds that are fresh-feeling or too green indicate that they haven’t reached full maturity, while pale-green, white, or very dark cannabis seeds may have trouble sprouting. However, it’s tricky to know the outcome of a popped seed, so trying may be worthwhile. If you’re not ready to pop your seeds yet, store them in a dark, cool place until it’s time for germination.

To employ water germination, fill a glass with tap water and let it sit until it reaches room temperature or around 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Add two to three plant seeds per cup and allow them to sit, watching for any changes. Change the water to fresh tap water every two days, making sure it stays at room temperature.

Ignore stuck shells if the leaves are already free. The shell will fall off on its own.

Why a seedling heat mat? Seeds germinate significantly faster when they’re kept 70-85°F (20-30°C). A seedling heat mat keeps seeds warm during the germination process. However, any warm spot works just as well (for example, on top of the refrigerator is the perfect temperature for some people). When you touch the wet paper towels, they should feel warm but not burning hot.

You may need to cut (or fold) paper towels so they fit completely inside plate

8.) Put Germinated Seeds in Rapid Rooters

Within a day or two under a light (or in a sunny window), you’ll have a bunch of happy seedings!

With a single sheet on top, you can still mostly see the seeds

Seedling heat mat to keep seedlings warm (or any surface that’s about 70-85°F or 20-30°C)

Cheap paper towels (don’t use the expensive cloth-like ones!)

Rockwool is ideal for germinating seeds. The method is a little different to when you do it with a paper towel. Check out this video for an in-depth tutorial on how to germinate seeds with rockwool.

Transporting your seeds can be a pain as they’re so sensitive. With paper towels, once your seeds start to sprout you need to transfer them into some soil, this is the only thing I prefer about the soil method, no transferring! They’re the only two drawbacks in my opinion though, so let’s take a look at germinating seeds in soil.

Another benefit to this is that you know if the seed has failed or not, saving time and effort. As everything is exposed, this also makes it easy to monitor the moisture levels and gives you greater control. It’s pretty much impossible to over water them with this method.

…In A Glass Of Water?

Germinating seeds on a paper towel can vary in time depending on the quality of the environment. If the conditions are ideal then you can expect your seeds to germinate in any time up to 7 days. If you can’t provide good conditions then it can take a little longer than that.

The first drawback is the exposure (which is also a positive as I mentioned earlier). Leaving your seeds exposed means they are a little vulnerable, even the slightest of touches can send them into an early grave. However, you shouldn’t really need to touch them anyway until you’re moving them into a planter, but you can just use tweezers for that. This also leads us onto our next drawback.

First of all, let’s get into the paper towel method. My personal favourite point about germinating seeds this way is that you can see exactly what stage they are at. Much like you can with home hydroponic farms, check them out here. They are completely exposed (which can also bring some drawbacks) so I can keep a close eye on them.

My friend always ask me why I tend to germinate my seeds on paper towels instead of soil. There’s quite a few reasons why I choose this method, most of the time anyway as I do sometimes opt for using heating mats. So, let’s compare the benefits and drawbacks to both methods. If you don’t want to read the full break down, here’s a quick summary so you can skip to my paper towel growing guide!