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after planting germinated weed seeds

• The ideal temperature is between 22° and 25°C (71–77°F)
• Your growing environment should be damp/moist, but never wet
• Relative humidity range should be between 70% and 90%
• Seeds favour fluorescent lighting (Cool White code 33)
• Minimise the amount of seed handling you do
• In hydroponic/rockwool plugs, the ideal PH value is 5.8–6.2

Before we jump straight into the germination methods, there are a couple of germination golden rules. For the best results, we recommend staying within these guidelines, no matter how you choose to germinate. That being said, of all the factors to consider, temperature is one of the most critical. Seeds will always seek out even the smallest amount of moisture, but they use temperature as a sign that they need to do so.

GERMINATION TEMPERATURE PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE

To avoid disappointment, seeds that have a darker colouration stand a better chance of germinating, while pale green or white seeds are likely to fail. Even if dark seeds look slightly damaged, they should be planted anyway. There is a good chance they will still germinate, even if the outer shell is somewhat crushed.

Regardless of where you get your seeds from, it is best to give them a slight (and delicate) inspection before planting. Most of the time, all seeds will germinate; however, poor-quality seeds will produce a weaker plant. Unfortunately, that is something you will not find out until well into the vegetative and flowering stages.

Maintaining the ideal temperature (between 22–25°C/71–77°F) and moisture for germination is tricky. Leaving seeds out in the open environment or on a windowsill is far from ideal; a DIY climate-controlled cupboard would do a much better service. A warming mat is perfect for maintaining a constant temperature, but it doesn’t tackle the issue of moisture.

The seed can easily break through the top of the soil without drying out. Again, placing a mark on the pencil can help you see when to stop pushing it down.

You can lightly pat the soil to ensure that the plant can absorb the moisture correctly. However, try not to press down on it firmly once it is covering the young seedling. If the soil becomes compact, the weed seed might have a hard time getting enough oxygen. Not to mention, there might be a higher chance of disease from poor drainage.

Some seeds may be tricky to plant and grow, but you do not need much regarding cannabis seeds. You will notice that many of the tools are already in your home. If you need to get any additional items, you can find them in a regular store or garden center. The list of equipment includes:

How Deep to Plant Marijuana Seeds in Soil?

Not to mention, hard seeds may need up to a week to begin sprouting due to a thicker coating. If they have not germinated after two weeks, then they are likely a dud.

When you place the germinated marijuana seed into the small dimple, make sure the root is facing downward. The root part needs to go deep into the hole as much as possible. The skin of the seed has to be at least .5 cm beneath the surface of the soil.

Weed seeds can grow indoors or outside, but growers need to pay attention to the time of year before planting outdoors. Cold temperatures can kill a cannabis plant, so you will need to place it outside as soon as winter ends. The recommended period is between April and mid-May. Seedlings require the entire growth cycle before temperatures drop again.

The dimple should be about a couple of centimeters deep. If you are using a pencil, an easy way to measure is by making the tiny hole erasure-deep. Like any plant, you do not want to plant the weed seed too far in the growing medium.

A germinating cannabis seed

The paper towel should never dry out once germination begins

Letting the germination medium dry out

Too often the seed is buried too deep (a problem that we have already seen in case of watering after planting the seed), so the seedling may never emerge. In the other case, if we sow too close to the surface, we can find that the seed germinates well but the stem grows weak, bending and not allowing the seedling to develop correctly.

So, you should plant the seed with the tip down and the crown uppermost and facing you. Once the seed germinates the crown will serve as a hinge, so that the seed will open at the tip and let out the root. In case of placing the seed incorrectly, the tap root will grow upward and the seedling downwards, which should be avoided at all costs because it is likely that the seedling will not be born.

In addition, the scarce space between the plants will also mean they will compete for available light, something not recommended if we want to get the most out of each plant. The plants will produce very little lateral branching, and will center their growth on a weak main stem, with too long an internodal distance, factors that usually affects negatively on the final yield of buds.